Causes and Symptoms of Achilles Tendinitis

Achilles was a Greek warrior known for his extreme toughness and invincibility everywhere except for the back of his heel. Therefore, he makes an appropriate namesake for the tendon in our leg that is the strongest in the body, yet is the subject of many sports injuries. The Achilles tendon attaches our calf muscle to our heel and plays an important role in just about any movement that involves the feet. Achilles tendinitis can strike people of all ages and of all athletic abilities and can severely limit mobility.

What causes Achilles tendinitis?

  • Abruptly stretching the tendon, like when sprinting or jumping
  • Increasing your exercise workload (distance, speed, etc.) without proper preparation
  • Failure to fully stretch and warm-up before exercising
  • Improperly fitting footwear
  • Engaging in intense physical activity after a long period of inactivity
  • Overuse

What are the symptoms?

  • Mild pain behind the heel after exercise that does not seem to go away
  • Persistent swelling in the lower calf area, with or without exercise
  • Stiffness and tenderness, especially when getting up and walking around for the first time after a night’s sleep

If you feel pain in your Achilles area during an activity, make sure to stop as quickly as possible! What begins as a dull pain may end up being a full rupture or tear. Icing, stretching, and wearing ankle braces or walking boots are also effective for prevention and recovery.

There may be times when the damage to the Achilles tendon is too great and surgery is the only possible option for a full recovery. Fortunately for individuals in Onondaga County, board-certified podiatrist Dr. Ryan L. D’Amico specializes in all types of foot and ankle surgery. At Syracuse Podiatry in Fayetteville, NY, you can expect professional care for ailments such as heel pain, cysts, bunions, and more. Contact us through our website or call us at (315) 446-3668 for any podiatry-related questions or concerns!

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